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Buy Now and Pay Later with 0% APR Credit Cards

  Use 0% APR Credit Cards to Make Purchases Now and Pay Later If you are need extra cash to make a big purchase, you may use a 0% APR credit card to buy now and pay later.  Credit cards with 0% intro APR  allow you to charge a purchase to your credit card now and pay off the credit-card balance over time without incurring interest or fees, as long as you make the  minimum payments  every month. At this time, many credit cards offer 0% introductory APR on purchases for 12 months or more. If you are short of cash for an expensive purchase, you can open a new credit card with 0% intro APR to enjoy the buying power now. After that, you can just make the minimum payment each billing cycle to avoid finance charges and pay off all the remaining balance at the end of your 0% introductory period. In this way, a 0% APR credit card not only helps you afford the purchase, but also helps you save money by paying no interest for a long time. Best 0% APR Credit Cards on Purchases Choose from one of t

Annual LLC Fees By State

The cost of annual LLC fees by state varies greatly from one state to another depending on specific state requirements. Aside from the one-time filing fee you pay the state to form your LLC, you must also pay the state an ongoing fee to keep your LLC in good standing.

1. LLC Annual Fee
2. How Much Does it Cost to Incorporate in Each State?
3. Business Registration Fees

The cost of annual LLC fees by state varies greatly from one state to another depending on specific state requirements. Aside from the one-time filing fee you pay the state to form your LLC, you must also pay the state an ongoing fee to keep your LLC in good standing. It is important to understand the annual LLC fees you need to pay to form and maintain an LLC in your state.

LLC Annual Fee

For your LLC to remain compliant and in operation, there are ongoing fees you must pay to your state. You must pay these fees regardless of how much income your LLC earns or how much activity it conducts. Some states require payment each year, while others require payment every two years. In more than 90 percent of states, the state will shut down your LLC if you do not pay your annual LLC fees.

How Much Does it Cost to Incorporate in Each State?

If you are thinking of forming an LLC in your state, there are two types of costs you will need to pay: startup costs and ongoing costs. At a minimum, startup costs include state LLC filing fees and service fees. Startup costs for forming an LLC may include the following services:

  • Hiring a business lawyer to file the Articles of Organization, or Certificate of Formation, with the local Secretary of State
  • Publishing a statement of formation in local newspapers 
  • Creating an operating agreement that defines how your LLC will conduct business and distribute profits and losses among members
  • Obtaining a federal employer identification number (EIN) from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)

Startup fees vary from state to state and can change at any time. Filing fees tend to cost more in states that are looking to raise extra funds. In some states, you may need to pay additional fees for consulting with a business lawyer or using service providers.

This table shows the startup and annual LLC fees by state.

State

LLC Filing 

LLC Initial Report

LLC Publication 

LLC Annual Report

Incorporation Filing 

Corporation Initial Report

Corporation Annual Report

Corporation Publication 

Incorporation Attorney Signature

Alabama

$165

 

 

$0

$165

 

$0

 

 

Alaska

$250

$0

 

$100

$250

$0

$100

 

 

Arizona

$50

 

$299 (required)

$0

$60

 

$45

$299

 

Arkansas

$50

 

 

$150

$50

 

$150

 

 

California

$75

$20

 

$20

$105

$25

$25

 

 

Colorado

$50

 

 

$10

$50

 

$10

 

 

Connecticut

$175

 

 

$20

$455

 

$100

 

 

District of Columbia

$220

 

 

$300

$220

 

$300

 

 

Delaware

$140

 

 

$300

$140

 

minimum $225

 

 

Florida

$155

 

 

$138.75

$78.75

 

$150

 

 

Georgia

$100

 

 

$50

$100

$50

$50

$150 (required for corporations)

 

Hawaii

$50

 

 

$15

$50

 

$15

 

 

Idaho

$100

 

 

$0

$101

 

$0

 

 

Illinois

$500

 

 

$305

$175

 

$155

 

 

Indiana

$90

 

 

$30

$90

 

$30

 

 

Iowa

$50

 

 

$45

$50

 

$55

 

 

Kansas

$160

 

 

$55

$90

 

$55

 

 

Kentucky

$55

 

 

$15

$55

 

$15

 

 

Louisiana

$100

 

 

$30

$100

 

$30

 

 

Maine

$175

 

 

$85

$145

 

$85

 

 

Maryland

$155

 

 

minimum $300

$155

 

minimum $300

 

 

Massachusetts

$520

 

 

$520

$295

 

$135

 

 

Michigan

$50

 

 

$25

$60

 

$25

 

 

Minnesota

$160

 

 

$0

$160

 

$0

 

 

Mississippi

$50

 

 

$25

$50

 

$25

 

 

Missouri

$50

 

 

$0

$58

$45

$45

 

 

Montana

$70

 

 

$15

$70

 

$15

 

 

Nebraska

$120

 

$150

$26

$65

 

$26

$150

 

Nevada

$75

$325

 

$325

$75

$325

$325

 

 

New Hampshire

$100

 

 

$100

$100

 

 

 

 

New Jersey

$125

 

 

$50

$125

 

$50

 

 

New Mexico

$50

 

 

$0

$100

$25

$25

 

 

New York

$210

 

$425–$1,200

$9

$145

 

$9

 

 

North Carolina

$125

 

 

$202

$125

 

$20

 

 

North Dakota

$135

 

 

$50

$100

 

$25

 

 

Ohio

$125

 

 

$0

$125

 

$0

 

 

Oklahoma

$104

 

 

$25

$52

 

$0

 

 

Oregon

$100

 

 

$100

$100

 

$100

 

 

Pennsylvania

$125

 

 

$0

$125

 

$0

$299

 

Rhode Island

$150

 

 

$50

$230

 

$50

 

 

South Carolina

$110

 

 

$0

$135

 

$0

 

$100

South Dakota

$150

 

 

$50

$150

 

$50

 

 

Tennessee

$325

 

 

$310

$125

 

$20

 

 

Texas

$310

 

 

Based on gross annual revenue

$310

 

Based on gross annual revenue

 

 

 

 

Utah

$72

 

 

$15

$72

 

$15

 

 

Vermont

$125

 

 

$25

$125

 

$35

 

 

Virginia

$104

 

 

$50

$79

 

$100

 

 

Washington

$200

$10

 

$73

$200

$10

$73

 

 

West Virginia

$132

 

 

$25

$82

 

$25

 

 

Wisconsin

$130

 

 

$25

$100

 

$40

 

 

Wyoming

$103

 

 

$52

$103

 

$52

 

 


Business Registration Fees

Before you can form an LLC, you must come up with a name for your company. You then need to register the name with the office of the Secretary of State in the state where you want to form your LLC. A business name search is part of the filing process in most states. Each state has unique requirements for naming a company. 

The name you choose for your LLC cannot be in use by any other company in the state where you are forming your LLC. If it is, the state will reject your business registration. You will need to pay an additional fee for filing a new business name. To avoid extra charges, you can conduct a business name search before filing to find out if the name you have chosen for your LLC is already in use by another company. 

The costs for annual LLC fees vary from state to state. Knowing what to expect can help you prepare for the startup and ongoing costs involved in forming and maintaining an LLC in your state.

If you need help finding out more about the annual LLC fees by state, you can contact us

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